Dunshelm

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Wolfshead
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Dunshelm

Post by Wolfshead »

If Dunshelm castle is on the Scots border why does Treguard talk like a Southerner?

I think his leige lord would probably be the Percy's or the Prince Bishop of Durham.
Snowcat
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Re:Dunshelm

Post by Snowcat »

If the people around me at the minute are correct. A 'Saxon' knight is of Scandinavian heritage IE 'Modern' day Viking. Therefore his accent shouldn't even by English!

On a practical note, to my knowledge Hugo Myatt is from the South and Knightmare wasn't exactly going for complete historical accuracy...

[Christ, if Scotland can get a parliament thanks to a kilted Aussie in a Hollywood fairytale... You've NOTHING to fear!]
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HStorm
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Re:Dunshelm

Post by HStorm »

According to the novels, Treguard spent over ten years living as a mercenary outside of the British Isles altogether. And I wouldn't say he sounds much like a southerner anyway, at least not in the early years. He just sounds like most Englishmen theoretically did at the time (a vaguely West Country accent).
Knightmare Audio Plays from The Dunshelm Players.
Wolfshead
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Re:Dunshelm

Post by Wolfshead »

Saxons came from Northern Germany i.e. Saxony, but they also came from Frisia. Juts come from Jutland in Southern Denmark. The venerable Bede said that Angles came from Schlizwig-Holstein on the border between German and Denmark, he said that som many came to England (Britain) that the region was totally de-populated.

Treguard is a Scandinavian name like Sigaurd

I think the correct pronounciation of Treguard would be Tregourd.

There were Anglo-Scandinavian knights in England in the 13th century, but they were rare.

Ever heard of Sir Hugh Swynford, d. 1371. He was a Saxon Knight with alleigence to John of Gaunt.

Hugo could've tried aNorthern Accent.
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HStorm
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Re:Dunshelm

Post by HStorm »

Yeah, you shouldn't confuse the Saxons with the Vikings. That's like something ridiculous... like, I dunno, someone from America confusing the Scots with the English. *Laughs.* I mean can you imagine something like...

Oh.
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Snowcat
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Re:Dunshelm

Post by Snowcat »

Pendragon, you know a lot more about the actual period than I do...

Hstorm........................ Having worked in the tourist industry since I was knee-high to a grass-hopper (improbable but correct according to me parents). You've no idea how many times that has happened...

My personal favourite pet-hate is being asked how far away LOCK Ness or LOCK Lomond are.

Ugh! *Shudders*
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SemtexJack
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Re:Dunshelm

Post by SemtexJack »

We have a similar problem here. Many people (not just Americans) pronounce my town as Here-fod...istead of Hair-E-Ford.

And as for Leominster. Just don't ask!

Yet we are all guilty of the same thing I'm sure. We must all have mispronounced a place name that we are unfamiliar with.
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Wolfshead
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Re:Dunshelm

Post by Wolfshead »

Americans can't get right:

Gloucester
Worcester
Liecester
Berwick
Loughborough
Salisbery
Edinburgh

etc.
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Re:Dunshelm

Post by SemtexJack »

Not being far from Gloucester and Worcester I have also seen this first hand.

And as for Salisbury. That is one I hadn't though of.

However, as I said before. It is not just Americans, many people have trouble with place names. Not sure of the exact spelling but how about Ynysybwl. Try pronouncing that!
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DerbyGem
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Re:Dunshelm

Post by DerbyGem »

...and as for the pronunciation of "Derby"

"Durby" >:(

*twitch* *grumble* grrr...

;)
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Wolfshead
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Re:Dunshelm

Post by Wolfshead »

Aside from all that what about Duns helm.

Dun or Duns meant something in Pictish, but I can't remember, does anyone know?

Besides Dunshelm there is:

The Forest of Dun
Duntly Wood
The Dunswater
Dungarth

Dunno anymore :)
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Re: Dunshelm

Post by MelonHeed »

Well, let's necro the smeg out of this. Is sixteen years a record? Anyway....

A number of points: lords are not known for speaking in regional accents. The Duke of Northumberland sounds nothing like a Northumbrian, because he speaks in an RP accent. Hugo Myatt also speaks in an RP accent. Certainly, he sounds "posher" than he did as Treguard, when he was amping up the drama in his voice. There are plenty of people who come from a region and sound nothing like the plebs who live there, because they were from a family who usually spoke RP. A good example would be the actress Rose Leslie, who speaks in a cut-glass RP way, because she went to boarding school as a child (I think in Somerset), but is actually Scottish.
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